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Seven Hills Will Bring All the Fresh Pasta to a New Nest on Russian Hill

The Italian neighborhood favorite is stretching into a new space — and announcing a little sister restaurant at its original location

Pasta at Seven Hills Seven Hills

Seven Hills, the Italian neighborhood restaurant tucked between Nob and Russian Hills, is finally reopening in the former Stones Throw space on Monday, December 9. The restaurant took over the location in January, telling Eater SF it hoped to open in spring of 2019, but 10 months, a seismic retrofit, and a lot of ADA-inspired improvements later, it’s finally happening. For Seven Hills, the move means a bigger space and expanded menu. But it’s two restaurant announcements in one: The original location will briefly close and reopen as a new little sister restaurant in January.

For nearly a decade, Seven Hills has been a neighborhood gem, tucked away on one of SF’s older and quieter hills, cable cars rumbling by. Michael Bauer gave it a glowing three-star review on his way out as the Chronicle’s restaurant critic, but it never quite found its footing on top restaurant lists. That really doesn’t matter: The neighborhood knows and loves this restaurant, which welcomes a steady stream of regulars with simple, comforting, Italian and Californian fare. That means fresh and filled pasta, house ricotta, daily fish specials, produce from the markets every other day, and half a pig every week.

It’s also quite cozy, which feels warm and wonderful in the dining room, and must turn the kitchen into a fiery hole. Owner Alexis Solomou says he’s been looking for a new space for some time, but really wanted to keep the comfort of the original space. “Food isn’t the only thing that brings people into a restaurant,” he says. “We have so many regulars, and they come back for the same feeling. So the staff, colors, art, and cushions are all coming with us.”

The new and improved Seven Hills is only moving three blocks, but it’s nearly doubling the space, increasing the kitchen staff, and enjoying an open kitchen and air conditioning. Solomou busted down walls, extended the bar, put in wine racks up to the ceiling, and added white marble counters and sea foam tiles. Between 10 seats at the bar, about 20 tables, and a back room, the restaurant is stretching out.

The maccheroncelli with house ricotta
Seven Hills

The menu is staying the same, at least for the moment. Longtime chef Anthony Florian originally came through Quince and Cotogna, and has been with the restaurant for six solid years. He’ll keep the crowd favorites, including the maccheroncelli, a tube-shaped extruded pasta tossed with crushed tomatoes, chiles, and dolloped with fresh ricotta. But with more space, he’ll be able to do more pasta and a whole animal program, including the heritage pork chops that he brines for 24 hours. Eventually, he’ll add breakfast and brunch, starting with coffee and pastries on weekdays, and full service on the weekends — offerings Stones Throw was known for and that (since its closing) the neighborhood has been missing.

The original Seven Hills location will briefly close and get a fresh coat of paint, before reopening in January as a little sister restaurant with a slightly different name and menu. While Seven Hills leans more Italian, this new concept will lean more Californian. Chef Christopher Ratcliff, who also came through Quince and Cotogna, is currently developing the menu. There are rumors of fried chicken. Stay tuned for more updates.

Seven Hills will reopen in the new space at 1896 Hyde Street on December 9. Hours will remain the same, serving dinner Monday to Thursday from 5:30 to 9:30 p.m., Friday and Saturday from 5 to 10 p.m., and Sunday from 5 to 9:30 p.m.

UPDATED December 6, 4:40 p.m.: An earlier version of this story stated the opening date for Seven Hills new location was December 5. The restaurant has since postponed the opening to December 9.

Seven Hills

1896 Hyde Street, , CA 94109 (415) 775-1550 Visit Website

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