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Caviar eclairs from Le Fantastique Patricia Chang

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Le Fantastique Spins Caviar Eclairs and Luxe Bubbles into Hayes Valley

The new seafood slash wine bar from from the Bird Dog team will open late August — and would you check out the fancy fish snacks, wine wall, and vinyl collection?

San Francisco’s Hayes Valley is filled with little nooks and crannies that offer some of the city’s finest low-key drinking and snacking options, from natural wine bars Fig & Thistle and Birba to the Linden Room’s craft cocktails. A new option is on the horizon, as the veteran restaurateur couple behind Palo Alto’s Bird Dog bring their own vision of the ideal hangout focusing on seafood and wine to the neighborhood. Le Fantastique is a longtime dream of owners Emily and Robbie Wilson, and it’s opening at the end of August with a very distinct vibe.

White wine from France, raw fish, and serious dedication to vinyl is at the heart of Le Fantastique, inspired by the duo’s friendship with fellow wine professional Chris Robles. Before Robles passed away from cancer, the friends dreamt up a restaurant concept to match their specific interests, drinking Champagne and chablis together, listening to records, and wondering why there wasn’t a restaurant that was as fun as their get-togethers. The result is a tribute to that friendship and an extension of the Wilsons’ hospitality.

Caviar set at Le Fantastique
Caviar set, warm madeleines, kaluga
Patricia Chang
Caviar eclairs at Le Fantastique
Caviar eclair, smoked onion, hasselback
Patricia Chang
Raw fish starter from Le Fantastique
Sea bream, kohlrabi, hyssop
Patricia Chang
Cooked fish small plate from Le Fantastique
King salmon, alderwood smoked, espelette, citron
Patricia Chang
Crab small plate from Le Fantastique
Japanese crab, sushi rice, crab fat, Hollandaise
Patricia Chang
Raw fish from Le Fantastique
Albacore, seaweed, poblano water
Patricia Chang

The core of the menu is raw fish, seasoned and cured in various ways, the Wilsons say. “We’re aging and curing fish, most of it’s still raw, but the things we’re flavoring it with, like grilled ribeye bones, are going to be really exciting,” Robbie says. “Our fabrication room is designed to age the fish, and we’ll be hanging and drying for seven days, and it creates an incredible tasting fish. It’s a lot of hits from the sushi bar, but it is not a sushi bar.”

There will be grilled and fried items as well, like delicately battered and fried shishito peppers and aged wagyu. And, of course, there will be caviar. One of Le Fantastique’s signature items is a miniature eclair topped with smoked onion creme fraiche, banana maple glaze, and topped with caviar.

Bread and cultured butter from Le Fantastique
Bread and butter
Patricia Chang
Fried shishito peppers from Le Fantastique
Crispy padrons with bonito vinegar
Patricia Chang
Dessert at Le Fantastique
Paris Brest
Patricia Chang
Dessert at Le Fantastique
Kakagori, pistachio praline, chocolate mousse
Patricia Chang

Bread is also a mainstay, featuring a very specific loaf that Robbie describes as the “marriage of sourdough and shokupan,” the perfect San Francisco mashup, served alongside cultured butter whipped with spicy crab fat and espelette pepper, and seaweed from Marin. Joe Hou (Angler) is leading that charge, as well as the pastry program, which will include fluffy mountains of kakigori for dessert.

As for the wine: There will be lots of it, all of it white, and much of it French. An aggressive by-the-glass selection will be available, allowing multiple pairings and exploration. “There are so many talented winemakers throughout California and the states, but we’re staying true to the origin story,” Robbie says. But also, “It wasn’t about drinking expensive Burgundy.” Expect Champagne and beers from the Savoie, says Wilson, from a clean, aromatic, and not overly expensive list.

Front bar at Le Fantastique Patricia Chang
Wall graffitti at Le Fantastique Patricia Chang

Inside, there’s a decidedly midcentury-inspired look, starting with diners’ first sight when they walk in: a 1970s turntable and hand-built McIntosh sound system with oversize speakers and tube amps. “We invested a lot in how we designed the sound in the space,” Robbie says. “And we are focused on music that is made for vinyl and sounds like vinyl. We take inspiration from the listening bars of Tokyo to old, classic music. We wanted diners to be able to hear that crackle of the needle to give that little detail.”

Designed by Studio Ren, the restaurant is a mix of classics and urban artwork, from the leather banquets and marble-topped tables to a graffiti mural that lines the bar. “It’s really simple and clean and comfortable,” says Robbie. “I always refer to it like a nice restaurant in the 11th arrondissement in Paris and a recording studio from the 70s in Los Angeles.” A private listening lounge has been dubbed “the Record Shop,” where guests can have drinks and plates of raw fish while enjoying Robbie’s featured records.

Most of all, the chef and team are ready to see people again, though there’s no such thing as good timing in these uncertain times. “I’m ready to see the energy of the dining room,” Robbie says. “The thing we keep coming back to is that [Le Fantastique] is really is about enjoying life. I can’t wait to have a glass of wine in hand, raw fish, and bread and butter, listening to some amazing tunes.”

Le Fantastique will open in late August. Opening hours are Tuesday to Saturday, 5:30 to 10 p.m.

Exterior of Le Fantastique Patricia Chang

Le Fantastique

22 Franklin St, SF, CA

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