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A steamer basket filled with 10 soup dumplings. Din Tai Fung

12 Don’t-Miss Dumpling Destinations in San Jose and the South Bay

From xiao long bao to siu mai to momo and more, the South Bay offers a galore of juicy and flavorful dumplings

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Whether they’re fried, steamed, baked, or boiled, dumplings can be enjoyed myriad ways. From classic dim sum variations like siu mai or har gow, or the slurp-worthy, soupy takes on these bite-sized packages, the South Bay Area boasts a variety of quality, handmade dumplings. The making of these filled pockets is respected almost as an art form — with incredible attention to detail when it comes to the folds and fillings, the chewy texture of the buns, the crispiness of the bottoms, and even the dipping sauces.

Here are the standout spots in the South Bay Area where you can find assortments of handcrafted dumplings.

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Note: Restaurants on this map are listed geographically.

The Everest Momo

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At Himalayan and Indo-Chinese food truck Everest Momo, momo are the star. These bite-sized Tibetan-style dumplings are a popular street food in Nepal, and at Everest Momo, they’re served with a hand-ground spicy chutney. The chicken momo are filled with chicken, onion, ginger, and cilantro, while the vegetable momo are packed with a medley of cabbage, green beans, asparagus, and onions in a light green wrap. The trucks can be found across the Bay Area in San Jose, Milpitas, and Sunnyvale, and visitors are often eager to also try the chow mein, fried rice, and soups. 

A plate with folded momo next to two sauces, one red and one orange. The Everest Momo

Dim Sum King

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For great dim sum takeout, look no further than Dim Sum King. Though the restaurant has been serving Chinese comfort food at this Sunnyvale location for the past 12 years, the restaurant moved to focus specifically on to-go orders during the pandemic. Wrapping more than 2,000 dumplings a day, Dim Sum King serves more than 30 menu items. The most commonly ordered dim sum dishes include har gow, siu mai, BBQ pork buns, and sticky rice wrapped in lotus leaves. Regulars also love the “Craaazy” Shrimp Ball — a nugget of shrimp paste smothered with crispy strips of egg roll wrap — as well as the Pork Football, a fried glutinous mochi filled with ground pork.

Dumpling Depot

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Family-owned Dumpling Depot is known for its assortment of hand-made dumplings, including soup dumplings and wontons. The restaurant’s most popular items mirror some of the most common dumpling fillings in Chinese tradition — pork and cabbage dumplings and pork, shrimp, and chive dumplings. Customers also love the Shanghai soup dumplings, and kids tend to gravitate toward the chicken dumplings with corn, as they have a mellower, slightly sweet flavor. The owners are local dumpling connoisseurs who began cranking out dumplings in San Francisco 20 years ago and have since expanded to the South Bay Area. In fact, they also own Epic Dumpling, another restaurant with the same menu offerings in Sunnyvale. 

Two plates of dumplings with soy sauce and chile oil. Dumpling Depot

Joy Dumpling

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You’ll find Joy Dumpling nestled in a Cupertino strip mall, and the spacious restaurant specializes in Taiwanese and Northern Chinese classics, with wall decorations that offer a rather immersive dining experience. Though some spots may focus on serving delicate and modest dumplings, Joy Dumpling is most well-known for its hefty, meaty fillings, particularly in the juicy pork dumplings and shu mai. The beef rolls and pan-fried dumplings are also fan favorites with a crispier texture, while the noodle dishes are known to be ultra-savory.

Fuji Huoshao & Dumpling

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Even as a smaller shop, Fuji Huoshao & Dumpling is known for its plump, chewy, and flavorful dumplings and stuffed flatbread called huoshao, a Beijing street food. The most popular dumpling orders consist of the Three Deluxe, which are filled with pork, chives, and shrimp. The dumplings are filled and folded at the counter by hand, and they can be steamed, or pan-fried for an extra dollar. The shop also has an array of frozen pre-made dumplings for sale — a great option for those who want to take some dumplings home for a quick meal later. 

Dough Zone Dumpling House Cupertino

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Hailing from Seattle, Washington, Dough Zone serves a variety of homemade Chinese comfort foods, most notably the pan-fried buns, known as Q-Bao, as well as the popular soup dumplings, or xiao long bao. The Q-Bao originates from Shanghai, and is filled with Berkshire-Duroc pork and aspic, then wrapped with dough. The buns are first steamed and then panfried, which results in a chewy top and a crispy bottom. The star of the xiao long bao is the savory, juicy filling of poultry, pork, and crab. Today, Dough Zone has locations in Washington, Oregon, and three in the Bay Area. 

A dumpling held by two chopsticks over a steamer basket. Dough Zone

Saigon Seafood Harbor

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For an energetic, fast-paced dim sum experience, Saigon Seafood Harbor has you covered. With multiple carts circulating the restaurant, guests find it easy to get their desired dim sum in a prompt manner. Classics like siu mai and har gow are certainly popular picks, but the chewy and crispy sesame balls filled with red bean paste are also very popular. The BBQ pork buns come in both steamed and baked varieties, while the curd skin rolls come with a generous amount of shrimp stuffed into light and crispy pieces of fried tofu.

Sifu Wong Kitchen

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Cantonese dim sum is a hit at Sifu Wong Kitchen, a restaurant founded by a Hong Kong chef who immigrated to the Bay Area. With a wide range of dim sum offerings, Sifu Wong is almost bound to have a line on the weekends. Fan favorites include the piping hot, steamed classics like siu mai and har gow. Customers also frequently order the pan-fried dumplings and the cheung fun — or rice rolls — which come with a generous amount of shrimp or pork filling. The salty egg yolk bun — a pillowy, steamed bun with a gooey duck egg filling — is another big hit. 

Plates of sui mai, rice rolls, and other dumplings. Sifu Wong Kitchen

Dumpling Time

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Dumpling Time first opened five years ago in the Design District of San Francisco, but this location in Santana Row has brought the restaurant’s signature dumplings to the South Bay. Not only can visitors watch them being made by hand in the glass-walled dumpling room, but they can also enjoy Chinese staples that incorporate higher-end ingredients like lobster and wagyu. Dumpling Time also takes soup dumplings to the next level, with the King Dum, a giant soup dumpling served with a large bubble-tea straw to extract the hot broth. Guests rave about the tom yum soup dumplings with pork belly and coconut milk filling, wrapped in a beet-colored dough. 

A table full of dumplings and other small plates. Isabel Baer

Din Tai Fung

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No dumpling guide would be complete without Din Tai Fung, the world-renowned Taiwanese restaurant chain. Since it was founded in 1972, the shop has focused on making and selling carefully crafted xiao long bao, steamed pork soup dumplings. To this day, Din Tai Fung weighs each dumpling to exactly 21 grams and folds them by hand to achieve the signature “golden ratio” of 18 folds. The company has opened 170 locations in 13 countries and boasts an extensive menu that includes an array of steamed buns and potstickers. Though the Hong Kong branch has garnered the most international acclaim with a Michelin Star, the Westfield Valley Fair location in San Jose definitely draws quite the crowd. 

An overhead view of a many baskets of dumplings on a table. Din Tai Fung

Koi Palace

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Koi Palace, one of the Bay Area’s legacy Chinese restaurants, serves an array of dim sum, live seafood, and roast meats. The restaurant first opened in Daly City in 1996 by two brothers who immigrated from Hong Kong and had a passion for Cantonese cuisine. Top sellers include the pork and shrimp siu mai, the shrimp har gow, and the rainbow xiao long bao, while the most popular family-style dishes are the soy sauce chicken and roast duck. The company currently has three locations in the Bay Area, with another coming soon to Cupertino. 

A steam basket with rainbow-colored soup dumplings. Koi Palace

Jade Cathay Chinese Restaurant

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Jade Cathay first opened in 2011 with a selection of handmade dim sum items and wok-fired dishes. Diners frequently stop by for dim sum during brunch hours, and the siu mai with pork and shrimp, sesame balls, cheung fun, and steamed egg custard bun make popular choices. Jade Cathay also offers a variety of dishes from the Canton region in China such as walnut shrimp and Mongolian beef, with a goal of recreating nostalgic meals with local ingredients. And for those who want some extra dumplings to enjoy later, the restaurant also offers an assortment of frozen dim sum to take home.  

An overhead view of plates of dumplings. Jade Cathay Chinese Restaurant

The Everest Momo

A plate with folded momo next to two sauces, one red and one orange. The Everest Momo

At Himalayan and Indo-Chinese food truck Everest Momo, momo are the star. These bite-sized Tibetan-style dumplings are a popular street food in Nepal, and at Everest Momo, they’re served with a hand-ground spicy chutney. The chicken momo are filled with chicken, onion, ginger, and cilantro, while the vegetable momo are packed with a medley of cabbage, green beans, asparagus, and onions in a light green wrap. The trucks can be found across the Bay Area in San Jose, Milpitas, and Sunnyvale, and visitors are often eager to also try the chow mein, fried rice, and soups. 

A plate with folded momo next to two sauces, one red and one orange. The Everest Momo

Dim Sum King

For great dim sum takeout, look no further than Dim Sum King. Though the restaurant has been serving Chinese comfort food at this Sunnyvale location for the past 12 years, the restaurant moved to focus specifically on to-go orders during the pandemic. Wrapping more than 2,000 dumplings a day, Dim Sum King serves more than 30 menu items. The most commonly ordered dim sum dishes include har gow, siu mai, BBQ pork buns, and sticky rice wrapped in lotus leaves. Regulars also love the “Craaazy” Shrimp Ball — a nugget of shrimp paste smothered with crispy strips of egg roll wrap — as well as the Pork Football, a fried glutinous mochi filled with ground pork.

Dumpling Depot

Two plates of dumplings with soy sauce and chile oil. Dumpling Depot

Family-owned Dumpling Depot is known for its assortment of hand-made dumplings, including soup dumplings and wontons. The restaurant’s most popular items mirror some of the most common dumpling fillings in Chinese tradition — pork and cabbage dumplings and pork, shrimp, and chive dumplings. Customers also love the Shanghai soup dumplings, and kids tend to gravitate toward the chicken dumplings with corn, as they have a mellower, slightly sweet flavor. The owners are local dumpling connoisseurs who began cranking out dumplings in San Francisco 20 years ago and have since expanded to the South Bay Area. In fact, they also own Epic Dumpling, another restaurant with the same menu offerings in Sunnyvale. 

Two plates of dumplings with soy sauce and chile oil. Dumpling Depot

Joy Dumpling

You’ll find Joy Dumpling nestled in a Cupertino strip mall, and the spacious restaurant specializes in Taiwanese and Northern Chinese classics, with wall decorations that offer a rather immersive dining experience. Though some spots may focus on serving delicate and modest dumplings, Joy Dumpling is most well-known for its hefty, meaty fillings, particularly in the juicy pork dumplings and shu mai. The beef rolls and pan-fried dumplings are also fan favorites with a crispier texture, while the noodle dishes are known to be ultra-savory.

Fuji Huoshao & Dumpling

Even as a smaller shop, Fuji Huoshao & Dumpling is known for its plump, chewy, and flavorful dumplings and stuffed flatbread called huoshao, a Beijing street food. The most popular dumpling orders consist of the Three Deluxe, which are filled with pork, chives, and shrimp. The dumplings are filled and folded at the counter by hand, and they can be steamed, or pan-fried for an extra dollar. The shop also has an array of frozen pre-made dumplings for sale — a great option for those who want to take some dumplings home for a quick meal later. 

Dough Zone Dumpling House Cupertino

A dumpling held by two chopsticks over a steamer basket. Dough Zone

Hailing from Seattle, Washington, Dough Zone serves a variety of homemade Chinese comfort foods, most notably the pan-fried buns, known as Q-Bao, as well as the popular soup dumplings, or xiao long bao. The Q-Bao originates from Shanghai, and is filled with Berkshire-Duroc pork and aspic, then wrapped with dough. The buns are first steamed and then panfried, which results in a chewy top and a crispy bottom. The star of the xiao long bao is the savory, juicy filling of poultry, pork, and crab. Today, Dough Zone has locations in Washington, Oregon, and three in the Bay Area. 

A dumpling held by two chopsticks over a steamer basket. Dough Zone

Saigon Seafood Harbor

For an energetic, fast-paced dim sum experience, Saigon Seafood Harbor has you covered. With multiple carts circulating the restaurant, guests find it easy to get their desired dim sum in a prompt manner. Classics like siu mai and har gow are certainly popular picks, but the chewy and crispy sesame balls filled with red bean paste are also very popular. The BBQ pork buns come in both steamed and baked varieties, while the curd skin rolls come with a generous amount of shrimp stuffed into light and crispy pieces of fried tofu.

Sifu Wong Kitchen

Plates of sui mai, rice rolls, and other dumplings. Sifu Wong Kitchen

Cantonese dim sum is a hit at Sifu Wong Kitchen, a restaurant founded by a Hong Kong chef who immigrated to the Bay Area. With a wide range of dim sum offerings, Sifu Wong is almost bound to have a line on the weekends. Fan favorites include the piping hot, steamed classics like siu mai and har gow. Customers also frequently order the pan-fried dumplings and the cheung fun — or rice rolls — which come with a generous amount of shrimp or pork filling. The salty egg yolk bun — a pillowy, steamed bun with a gooey duck egg filling — is another big hit. 

Plates of sui mai, rice rolls, and other dumplings. Sifu Wong Kitchen

Dumpling Time

A table full of dumplings and other small plates. Isabel Baer

Dumpling Time first opened five years ago in the Design District of San Francisco, but this location in Santana Row has brought the restaurant’s signature dumplings to the South Bay. Not only can visitors watch them being made by hand in the glass-walled dumpling room, but they can also enjoy Chinese staples that incorporate higher-end ingredients like lobster and wagyu. Dumpling Time also takes soup dumplings to the next level, with the King Dum, a giant soup dumpling served with a large bubble-tea straw to extract the hot broth. Guests rave about the tom yum soup dumplings with pork belly and coconut milk filling, wrapped in a beet-colored dough. 

A table full of dumplings and other small plates. Isabel Baer

Din Tai Fung

An overhead view of a many baskets of dumplings on a table. Din Tai Fung

No dumpling guide would be complete without Din Tai Fung, the world-renowned Taiwanese restaurant chain. Since it was founded in 1972, the shop has focused on making and selling carefully crafted xiao long bao, steamed pork soup dumplings. To this day, Din Tai Fung weighs each dumpling to exactly 21 grams and folds them by hand to achieve the signature “golden ratio” of 18 folds. The company has opened 170 locations in 13 countries and boasts an extensive menu that includes an array of steamed buns and potstickers. Though the Hong Kong branch has garnered the most international acclaim with a Michelin Star, the Westfield Valley Fair location in San Jose definitely draws quite the crowd. 

An overhead view of a many baskets of dumplings on a table. Din Tai Fung

Koi Palace

A steam basket with rainbow-colored soup dumplings. Koi Palace

Koi Palace, one of the Bay Area’s legacy Chinese restaurants, serves an array of dim sum, live seafood, and roast meats. The restaurant first opened in Daly City in 1996 by two brothers who immigrated from Hong Kong and had a passion for Cantonese cuisine. Top sellers include the pork and shrimp siu mai, the shrimp har gow, and the rainbow xiao long bao, while the most popular family-style dishes are the soy sauce chicken and roast duck. The company currently has three locations in the Bay Area, with another coming soon to Cupertino. 

A steam basket with rainbow-colored soup dumplings. Koi Palace

Jade Cathay Chinese Restaurant

An overhead view of plates of dumplings. Jade Cathay Chinese Restaurant

Jade Cathay first opened in 2011 with a selection of handmade dim sum items and wok-fired dishes. Diners frequently stop by for dim sum during brunch hours, and the siu mai with pork and shrimp, sesame balls, cheung fun, and steamed egg custard bun make popular choices. Jade Cathay also offers a variety of dishes from the Canton region in China such as walnut shrimp and Mongolian beef, with a goal of recreating nostalgic meals with local ingredients. And for those who want some extra dumplings to enjoy later, the restaurant also offers an assortment of frozen dim sum to take home.  

An overhead view of plates of dumplings. Jade Cathay Chinese Restaurant

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