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10 Great Places for Oysters in Coastal Marin

Beach days call for bivalves

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With Tomales Bay promising all things fresh and briny, obviously the best thing to eat when you’re out in West Marin is the humble oyster. And why stop at just 6 or 12, when there are so many places to enjoy these salty fruits of the sea? Grab a bushel to shuck and eat immediately, or transport home for later enjoyment.

Whether you’ve been hiking the headlands, hanging at the beach, or swimming in the bay— slurping up some oysters is a great daytime activity.

Did we miss your favorite place? Let us know in the comments. Note: the following points are listed geographically, not ranked.

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Note: Restaurants on this map are listed geographically.
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Rocker Oysterfeller's Kitchen + Saloon

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Technically in Sonoma County but so worth the few extra miles, this Southern-flavored roadhouse takes the mash-up of its name from the cheesy hot oyster dish developed at Antoine's New Orleans kitchen in 1899 (said to be as "rich as a Rockefeller," and the color of money) and celebrates the bivalve from there. Rocker has them six ways: raw with a simple mignonette, fired up with Louisiana hot sauce, covered with local cheese, spiced with kimchee, floating in a traditional garlic butter, and a signature take on the original's green puree. The small, welcoming bar couldn't be a better antidote to a winter afternoon and, on warm days, the back patio is a hidden treasure that you should claim for your own.

Tina O./Yelp

Nick's Cove & Cottages

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Rescued in 2005 by iconic restaurateur Pat Kuleto and restored to the tune of some $13 million as a kitschy paean to imagined fish shacks of yore in 2007, Nick's remains a superb spot to sit perched over the waters of Tomales Bay, slurping down oysters. Kuleto sold in 2011, and the excellence of the enterprise has somewhat dimmed, but the view is still damned fine and the food is fresh and worthy of a visit. Be sure to leave time to walk all the way down the pier to sit hidden in the tiny boat cabin at its end, where a wood stove is stoked in the winter and a glorious view awaits any time of year. Complimentary valet parking and cozy cottages complete the deal.

Kate N./Yelp

Hog Island Oyster Farm

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Hog Island's crazy success — and if you're not eating them in Marshall, try them at the SF Ferry Building or Napa's Oxbow Public Market — means that just dropping by is no longer possible. You may reserve a picnic table or a spot at the Boat Oyster Bar over the bay, but the easy old days of just showing up are gone. Once you've figured out the how and the when, relax into the yes of it all. Plan to bring your own picnic and wine to accompany your grill, or enjoy slurping the afternoon away with housemade accompaniments at the bar. This could be the ultimate day trip — just so long as you plan ahead.

Hog Island Oyster Co.

The Marshall Store

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Parking is on the shoulder, ordering is inside the store, and seating is first come, first serve, but once you're hunched over a glorious plate of oysters (you'll get used to the traffic zipping behind you on Highway 1), it's all worth it. Bivalves are offered half a dozen ways — including with chorizo or smoked with crostini — and they all come directly from their own beds at the Tomales Bay Oyster Company, which couldn't be a closer connection to the brine of the bay. Informal to the max, the Marshall Store is everything seafood and a particularly great place to indulge in Dungeness crab while it's still in season.

Y D./Yelp

Tony's Seafood Restaurant

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Established in 1948, Tony's is the kind of old-fashioned joint that sticks in visitor's memories, meaning that if your aunt stopped by there in the 60s, you might find yourself taking her there again. Coming of age in the era when everything was better battered and deep fried, Tony's does do raw and barbecued oysters, but it shines when stuffing fried oysters between two pieces of griddled bread, slathering them with tartar sauce, and calling it good. Perched out over the water with indelible views, whether it's 1968 or 2016 — you'll likely call it good, too. Cash only; ATM onsite.

Larry K./Yelp

Saltwater Oyster Depot

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An aquatic farmer as well as a chef, owner Luc Chamberland definitely knows his oysters — he serves them on the half shell and broiled, also offering a smoke-poached oyster in a French/Japanese marriage of umami and pastry. The "raw deal" is a best bet, featuring a dozen oysters of your choosing paired with an excellent glass of wine for just $42.

Osteria Stellina

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Equally stunning for lunch or dinner, Stellina offers raw bar options at both seatings with local oysters a stalwart item. Begin your meal in a civilized manner by slurping down Marin County miyagi or Drake's Bay oysters elegantly served with the house cocktail sauce and a Champagne mignonette. As an added bonus, move on to the superb kitchen's other fresh offerings.

Ruby G./Yelp

Station House Cafe

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A "shucker's dozen" finds the shucker just as generous as the baker, with 13 local oysters on the plate, fresh from the ocean or grill, accompanied by barbecue sauce or garlic butter. This long-time West Marin institution also deep-fries breaded oysters as an hors d'oeuvre or tucks them into a traditional Hangtown Fry omelet for breakfast and brunch. Live music in the charming small bar on Sundays and a mature garden that's been growing for decades make for an interesting dining oasis. Make a point of pairing your oysters with a salad if only for the pickled carrots and feta house dressing.

Rachel H./Yelp

Cafe Reyes

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Whether you're staggering off the trail or just back from the beach, Cafe Reyes is the perfect informal go-to spot to rehydrate and recoup with some cold oysters and beer. Celebrated for the breads and pizzas that emerge from its wood-burning oven, this relaxed eatery sends platters of fresh raw oysters straight from the kitchen into the happy mouths of ravenous hikers. The no-fuss outdoor area is great for kids just released from the car and the free cookies pressed upon you when you pay end it all on a sweet note.

Judy H./Yelp

Sir And Star at the Olema

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The poetic menu changes sometimes daily, so while oysters are not guaranteed on every visit, they're deliciously served with a briny chop of seaweed and a mignonette containing house-pickled mustard seed and sweet shallots when available. Or in a shot glass with just the lightest touch of sea foam. Or fried up hot with local potatoes. No matter what, though, if they're on the menu, they're always delicious. Helmed by the team that made Manka's a treasured memory, dining at the Sir and Star involves risks. Whether oysters are on the menu or not, It's guaranteed that whatever food there is will be locally sourced, thoughtful, and delicious. It's not guaranteed that the host or server will deign to either host or serve you.

Glen G./Yelp

Rocker Oysterfeller's Kitchen + Saloon

Tina O./Yelp

Technically in Sonoma County but so worth the few extra miles, this Southern-flavored roadhouse takes the mash-up of its name from the cheesy hot oyster dish developed at Antoine's New Orleans kitchen in 1899 (said to be as "rich as a Rockefeller," and the color of money) and celebrates the bivalve from there. Rocker has them six ways: raw with a simple mignonette, fired up with Louisiana hot sauce, covered with local cheese, spiced with kimchee, floating in a traditional garlic butter, and a signature take on the original's green puree. The small, welcoming bar couldn't be a better antidote to a winter afternoon and, on warm days, the back patio is a hidden treasure that you should claim for your own.

Tina O./Yelp

Nick's Cove & Cottages

Kate N./Yelp

Rescued in 2005 by iconic restaurateur Pat Kuleto and restored to the tune of some $13 million as a kitschy paean to imagined fish shacks of yore in 2007, Nick's remains a superb spot to sit perched over the waters of Tomales Bay, slurping down oysters. Kuleto sold in 2011, and the excellence of the enterprise has somewhat dimmed, but the view is still damned fine and the food is fresh and worthy of a visit. Be sure to leave time to walk all the way down the pier to sit hidden in the tiny boat cabin at its end, where a wood stove is stoked in the winter and a glorious view awaits any time of year. Complimentary valet parking and cozy cottages complete the deal.

Kate N./Yelp

Hog Island Oyster Farm

Hog Island Oyster Co.

Hog Island's crazy success — and if you're not eating them in Marshall, try them at the SF Ferry Building or Napa's Oxbow Public Market — means that just dropping by is no longer possible. You may reserve a picnic table or a spot at the Boat Oyster Bar over the bay, but the easy old days of just showing up are gone. Once you've figured out the how and the when, relax into the yes of it all. Plan to bring your own picnic and wine to accompany your grill, or enjoy slurping the afternoon away with housemade accompaniments at the bar. This could be the ultimate day trip — just so long as you plan ahead.

Hog Island Oyster Co.

The Marshall Store

Y D./Yelp

Parking is on the shoulder, ordering is inside the store, and seating is first come, first serve, but once you're hunched over a glorious plate of oysters (you'll get used to the traffic zipping behind you on Highway 1), it's all worth it. Bivalves are offered half a dozen ways — including with chorizo or smoked with crostini — and they all come directly from their own beds at the Tomales Bay Oyster Company, which couldn't be a closer connection to the brine of the bay. Informal to the max, the Marshall Store is everything seafood and a particularly great place to indulge in Dungeness crab while it's still in season.

Y D./Yelp

Tony's Seafood Restaurant

Larry K./Yelp

Established in 1948, Tony's is the kind of old-fashioned joint that sticks in visitor's memories, meaning that if your aunt stopped by there in the 60s, you might find yourself taking her there again. Coming of age in the era when everything was better battered and deep fried, Tony's does do raw and barbecued oysters, but it shines when stuffing fried oysters between two pieces of griddled bread, slathering them with tartar sauce, and calling it good. Perched out over the water with indelible views, whether it's 1968 or 2016 — you'll likely call it good, too. Cash only; ATM onsite.

Larry K./Yelp

Saltwater Oyster Depot

An aquatic farmer as well as a chef, owner Luc Chamberland definitely knows his oysters — he serves them on the half shell and broiled, also offering a smoke-poached oyster in a French/Japanese marriage of umami and pastry. The "raw deal" is a best bet, featuring a dozen oysters of your choosing paired with an excellent glass of wine for just $42.

Osteria Stellina

Ruby G./Yelp

Equally stunning for lunch or dinner, Stellina offers raw bar options at both seatings with local oysters a stalwart item. Begin your meal in a civilized manner by slurping down Marin County miyagi or Drake's Bay oysters elegantly served with the house cocktail sauce and a Champagne mignonette. As an added bonus, move on to the superb kitchen's other fresh offerings.

Ruby G./Yelp

Station House Cafe

Rachel H./Yelp

A "shucker's dozen" finds the shucker just as generous as the baker, with 13 local oysters on the plate, fresh from the ocean or grill, accompanied by barbecue sauce or garlic butter. This long-time West Marin institution also deep-fries breaded oysters as an hors d'oeuvre or tucks them into a traditional Hangtown Fry omelet for breakfast and brunch. Live music in the charming small bar on Sundays and a mature garden that's been growing for decades make for an interesting dining oasis. Make a point of pairing your oysters with a salad if only for the pickled carrots and feta house dressing.

Rachel H./Yelp

Cafe Reyes

Judy H./Yelp

Whether you're staggering off the trail or just back from the beach, Cafe Reyes is the perfect informal go-to spot to rehydrate and recoup with some cold oysters and beer. Celebrated for the breads and pizzas that emerge from its wood-burning oven, this relaxed eatery sends platters of fresh raw oysters straight from the kitchen into the happy mouths of ravenous hikers. The no-fuss outdoor area is great for kids just released from the car and the free cookies pressed upon you when you pay end it all on a sweet note.

Judy H./Yelp

Sir And Star at the Olema

Glen G./Yelp

The poetic menu changes sometimes daily, so while oysters are not guaranteed on every visit, they're deliciously served with a briny chop of seaweed and a mignonette containing house-pickled mustard seed and sweet shallots when available. Or in a shot glass with just the lightest touch of sea foam. Or fried up hot with local potatoes. No matter what, though, if they're on the menu, they're always delicious. Helmed by the team that made Manka's a treasured memory, dining at the Sir and Star involves risks. Whether oysters are on the menu or not, It's guaranteed that whatever food there is will be locally sourced, thoughtful, and delicious. It's not guaranteed that the host or server will deign to either host or serve you.

Glen G./Yelp

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