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A table of dishes from Good Good Culture Club. Patricia Chang

22 Destination Restaurants and Bars in the Mission District

Where to eat and drink in one of San Francisco’s most delicious neighborhoods

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Celebrating the Mission can be as complicated as the neighborhood’s rich history, and as more people move into the neighborhood, complex issues tend to crop up more and more. Even food and drink in the historically Latin American neighborhood can be divisive, but this map aims to offer something for every kind of diner.

This list encompasses places to buy an excellent pastry, get caffeinated, grab a drink, or find a bite to eat, hitting everything from top-notch cocktail bars to solid burger joints to Michelin-starred dinner destinations — and just about everything in between. As ever, the Mission District contains vast arrays of possibilities. Here are 22 great options.

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Rintaro

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Drawing on chef Sylvan Mishima Brackett’s early days as a bona fide bento box artiste, this Mission District izakaya continues to offer one of the best Japanese dining experiences in a city that’s crowded with them. Expect an ever-changing lineup of fresh fish and skewers hot off the restaurant’s binchotan charcoal grill. But don’t overlook the incredibly creamy housemade tofu either.

Panchita's Pupusería & Restaurant

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Pupusas deserve more than this brief aside considering the Mission hosts a lot of great Salvadoran food. But it would also be a great disservice to leave off Panchita’s, with its pupusas stuffed with pork, beans, and cheese, piled with its cabbage slaw.

Panchita’s #2

After a stylish makeover, this bar looks a little bit like the Overlook Hotel — and that is no reason not to go. The speakeasy in back is still being redone, but one can still stop by and grab a beer at this storied neighborhood favorite. There’s a new cocktail menu starring dozen cocktails and a few highballs, including the Friend of the Devil, a clarified milk punch laced with rye, chocolate stout, and cherry, served over an engraved ice cube.

Chuck’s Takeaway

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Slanted Door chef Charles Phan returned to his roots in the Mission with the opening of Chuck’s Takeaway, a takeout-only sandwich shop tacked onto the front of his massive bakery and commercial kitchen. It’s a tight menu of about a half dozen handhelds, everything from an Italian-inspired bollito dripping with braised beef belly to a traditional banh mi sporting a thick stack of made-in-house pate, pork cha, and chicken liver pate. You can’t go wrong with any option and don’t forget to get a housemade soda to wash it down.

Chuck’s egg salad sandwich on a ceramic plate. Patricia Chang

Since opening in October 2021, this itty-bitty izakaya has been bringing the good vibes and great food to Mission near 18th Street. There are no reservations and you can’t order takeout; you’ve got to nab one of the six small tables to order from the quirky menu that spans items like tonkotsu ramen and takoyaki to all manner of charcoal-grilled skewers and fried durian. 

Good Good Culture Club

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Chef Ravi Kapur’s genre-defying Liholiho Yacht Club has yet to make its return, but in the meantime, he’s empowering a team of LYC alumni to explore food from across the Asian diaspora at Good Good Culture Club. Start your meal with Lao-inspired stuffed chicken wings before diving into dishes like red curry, chili misoyaki-marinated short ribs, and grilled rice balls. If you’re looking for an outdoor dining option, the restaurant’s colorful rooftop terrace is one of the best in town.

Two adobo glazed chicken wings from Good Good Culture Club. Patricia Chang

Handroll Project

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Diners likely know partners Tan Truong and chef Geoffrey Lee as the duo behind Michelin-starred Ju-Ni and Hina Yakitori but with their latest restaurant settled into an airy space on the corner of 18th and Guerrero streets, they’re keeping things causal. At least, as causal as you can be while still using ingredients like wagyu, uni, glowing orbs of ikura, and shaved monkfish liver pate. For now, the restaurant remains walk-in only, but even a two-hour wait is worth the opportunity to devour one of the 5, 7, or 10-piece handroll sets with a glass of cloudy, sweet sake.

A chef’s poke handroll. Patricia Chang

Tartine Bakery

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Tartine has gone through a number of openings, closings, and changes across the board in the last few years. But through it all, the original bakery on 18th and Guerrero is still, thankfully, a treat, and now the staff are members of the International Longshore and Warehouse Union (ILWU) so those morning buns are in support of workers and your Instagram feed.

WesBurger n' More

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The art of the smashburger has been all but perfected at Wes Rowe’s eponymous burger joint, each thin patty grilled to achieve those crispy, frilly edges that make the burger style so appealing. He serves them topped with pickles, onions, special sauce, and American cheese if you want to keep things classic, though you can gussy yours up with add-ons like onion rings, jalapenos, and peanut butter and jelly – if you so please. As for sides? It’s got to be tots. 

A Wesburger with melted American cheese and a potato bun. Wes Rowe

The Korner Store

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The Korner Store is nothing short of an absolute gift of an addition to the Valencia corridor. The soju slushies are as good as they sound, and the octopus seaweed salads are excellent. Boiler Room DJ sets blare throughout the tiny, open-air shop, and a raucous crowd will no doubt form every weekend night.

Lazy Bear

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An underground dinner party pop-up turned permanent (two-Michelin-star) restaurant, Lazy Bear typically leaves diners/guests raving about the talents of host/chef David Barzelay. Prior to the pandemic, each group would start by mingling upstairs over snacks like crispy, tempura-battered maitake mushrooms, then descend to large communal tables downstairs for a full tasting menu. During the pandemic, the team got playful with a “Lazy Bear Camp Commissary,” takeout menu, but now with reopening, it’s swinging back to the full experience with seated dinners.

Lazy Bear
Lazy Bear
Patricia Chang

SAN HO WON

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It’s no small feat to snag a table at this latest restaurant from chef Cory Lee, who holds three Michelin stars at his fine dining restaurant Benu. But at this modern and minimalist restaurant in the Mission, Lee and chef Jeong-In Hwang elevate Korean barbecue to elegant heights, presenting thick slabs of charred beef tongue and double-cut galbi along with an array of banchan, bubbling stews, and sweet honey butter corn on the cob.

Korean barbecue in a lettuce leaf at San Ho Won Eric Wolfinger

Trick Dog

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Clever cocktail menu themes that change every six months keep crowds coming back to Trick Dog. Owners Josh Harris and Bon Vivants Hospitality always have something up their sleeves, and are known for strange ingredients — Ritz crackers have made an appearance in drinks — but deliciousness is typically the guiding principle. During the pandemic, the theme flipped to “Quik Dog,” selling hot dogs and cocktails out to the sidewalk, which you can still order for delivery or pick-up.

Trick Dog
Trick Dog

Flour + Water

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Following a months-long closure and renovation, fresh pasta destination Flour + Water returned with a sophisticated new look last year. Wrapped in warm neutral tones, the dining room now feels like the perfect setting for a special night out — one inevitably filled with a mosaic-like platter of crudo and a selection of handmade pasta, whether it be a tangle of rye pappardelle or a neatly folded ravioli stuffed with smoked duck. More than a decade in, this icon remains one of San Francisco’s most excellent Italian restaurants. 

A table of plates with crudo, pasta, and wine at Flour + Water. Krescent Carasso

Foreign Cinema

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John Clark and Gayle Pirie’s landmark Mission restaurant, which is still enchanting after more than two decades, continues to delight diners with oysters, pâtés, and Madras curry sesame fried chicken while projected films light up the striking patio. Brunch is a particular favorite for dishes like Champagne omelets and house-made pop tarts.

Foreign Cinema Foreign Cinema

A team of industry pros — Alvaro Rojas (Elda), Nicolas Torres (True Laurel), Nora Furst (Uma Casa), and Claire Sprouse (Hunky Dory in Brooklyn) — flipped the former Californios space into a buzzy but cozy and casual neighborhood bar with an exciting collection of natural wines available to enjoy on-site or to take to-go. On the small food menu look for fancy bar snacks like a fingerling potato salad and sweet Brentwood corn on the cob. The star, however, is the fried mortadella sandwich, a fat stack of meat and melted cheese. 

A table full of dishes at Buddy Albert Law

Grand Coffee

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Nabeel Slimi grew up between the Bay Area and Palestine and, after the Great Recession, found a way to create a space for all of that richness, and everyone else out there with a similar complexity. The coffee is tasty, the familiar milk chocolate notes of a solid light roast anyone on Mission Street would be delighted to find.

El Gallo Giro

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Saunter up to this storied truck and order yourself a plate of impossibly crispy and juicy carnitas tacos buried under a flurry of onions and cilanto. You won’t regret it. El Gallo Giro is widely respected as one of the best taco spots in the city, parked at 23rd Street and Treat Avenue, from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Monday through Friday.

Stefanie Tuder

La Torta Gorda

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This is the best place in San Francisco to get your torta fix, whether you’re craving a soggy, sauce-soaked pambazo or a pierna enchilada stacked with roast pork, avocado, refried beans, pickled chiles, and a red adobo chile sauce. It’s a casual, lively spot for an al fresco lunch or a hearty breakfast. 

Luke Tsai

El Nuevo Frutilandia

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Walking onto Calle 24, or Veinticuatro, is a beautiful sensation. The Latino Cultural District hosts more devastatingly delicious restaurants than can be listed here, but of note is Puerto Rican and Cuban joint Fruitlandia. The tiny 55-year-old business deserves all the acclaim — just try the sweet plantains.

La Taqueria

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La Taqueria — or La Taq, as the locals are wont to say — is more than just another restaurant serving quality tacos and burritos in this storied neighborhood. It’s a veritable institution, having earned the title of America’s Best Burrito. If you’re on the hunt of a Mission-style burrito you’ll find a worthy version here, and it’s famously rice-free, making it a (slightly) lighter option. 

Reem's California Mission

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Reem’s is definitely a destination-worthy spot for slow-roasted lamb, oven-fresh flatbreads, and tangy labneh layered with honey and fruit, but the Mission bakery is also a cozy neighborhood spot, with a sunny dining room and a walk-up window through which the staff push cardamom-scented coffees, pastries, and sandwiches to-go.

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Rintaro

Drawing on chef Sylvan Mishima Brackett’s early days as a bona fide bento box artiste, this Mission District izakaya continues to offer one of the best Japanese dining experiences in a city that’s crowded with them. Expect an ever-changing lineup of fresh fish and skewers hot off the restaurant’s binchotan charcoal grill. But don’t overlook the incredibly creamy housemade tofu either.

Panchita's Pupusería & Restaurant

Pupusas deserve more than this brief aside considering the Mission hosts a lot of great Salvadoran food. But it would also be a great disservice to leave off Panchita’s, with its pupusas stuffed with pork, beans, and cheese, piled with its cabbage slaw.

Panchita’s #2

Dalva

After a stylish makeover, this bar looks a little bit like the Overlook Hotel — and that is no reason not to go. The speakeasy in back is still being redone, but one can still stop by and grab a beer at this storied neighborhood favorite. There’s a new cocktail menu starring dozen cocktails and a few highballs, including the Friend of the Devil, a clarified milk punch laced with rye, chocolate stout, and cherry, served over an engraved ice cube.

Chuck’s Takeaway

Slanted Door chef Charles Phan returned to his roots in the Mission with the opening of Chuck’s Takeaway, a takeout-only sandwich shop tacked onto the front of his massive bakery and commercial kitchen. It’s a tight menu of about a half dozen handhelds, everything from an Italian-inspired bollito dripping with braised beef belly to a traditional banh mi sporting a thick stack of made-in-house pate, pork cha, and chicken liver pate. You can’t go wrong with any option and don’t forget to get a housemade soda to wash it down.

Chuck’s egg salad sandwich on a ceramic plate. Patricia Chang

Chome

Since opening in October 2021, this itty-bitty izakaya has been bringing the good vibes and great food to Mission near 18th Street. There are no reservations and you can’t order takeout; you’ve got to nab one of the six small tables to order from the quirky menu that spans items like tonkotsu ramen and takoyaki to all manner of charcoal-grilled skewers and fried durian. 

Good Good Culture Club

Chef Ravi Kapur’s genre-defying Liholiho Yacht Club has yet to make its return, but in the meantime, he’s empowering a team of LYC alumni to explore food from across the Asian diaspora at Good Good Culture Club. Start your meal with Lao-inspired stuffed chicken wings before diving into dishes like red curry, chili misoyaki-marinated short ribs, and grilled rice balls. If you’re looking for an outdoor dining option, the restaurant’s colorful rooftop terrace is one of the best in town.

Two adobo glazed chicken wings from Good Good Culture Club. Patricia Chang

Handroll Project

Diners likely know partners Tan Truong and chef Geoffrey Lee as the duo behind Michelin-starred Ju-Ni and Hina Yakitori but with their latest restaurant settled into an airy space on the corner of 18th and Guerrero streets, they’re keeping things causal. At least, as causal as you can be while still using ingredients like wagyu, uni, glowing orbs of ikura, and shaved monkfish liver pate. For now, the restaurant remains walk-in only, but even a two-hour wait is worth the opportunity to devour one of the 5, 7, or 10-piece handroll sets with a glass of cloudy, sweet sake.

A chef’s poke handroll. Patricia Chang

Tartine Bakery

Tartine has gone through a number of openings, closings, and changes across the board in the last few years. But through it all, the original bakery on 18th and Guerrero is still, thankfully, a treat, and now the staff are members of the International Longshore and Warehouse Union (ILWU) so those morning buns are in support of workers and your Instagram feed.

WesBurger n' More

The art of the smashburger has been all but perfected at Wes Rowe’s eponymous burger joint, each thin patty grilled to achieve those crispy, frilly edges that make the burger style so appealing. He serves them topped with pickles, onions, special sauce, and American cheese if you want to keep things classic, though you can gussy yours up with add-ons like onion rings, jalapenos, and peanut butter and jelly – if you so please. As for sides? It’s got to be tots. 

A Wesburger with melted American cheese and a potato bun. Wes Rowe

The Korner Store

The Korner Store is nothing short of an absolute gift of an addition to the Valencia corridor. The soju slushies are as good as they sound, and the octopus seaweed salads are excellent. Boiler Room DJ sets blare throughout the tiny, open-air shop, and a raucous crowd will no doubt form every weekend night.

Lazy Bear

An underground dinner party pop-up turned permanent (two-Michelin-star) restaurant, Lazy Bear typically leaves diners/guests raving about the talents of host/chef David Barzelay. Prior to the pandemic, each group would start by mingling upstairs over snacks like crispy, tempura-battered maitake mushrooms, then descend to large communal tables downstairs for a full tasting menu. During the pandemic, the team got playful with a “Lazy Bear Camp Commissary,” takeout menu, but now with reopening, it’s swinging back to the full experience with seated dinners.

Lazy Bear
Lazy Bear
Patricia Chang

SAN HO WON

It’s no small feat to snag a table at this latest restaurant from chef Cory Lee, who holds three Michelin stars at his fine dining restaurant Benu. But at this modern and minimalist restaurant in the Mission, Lee and chef Jeong-In Hwang elevate Korean barbecue to elegant heights, presenting thick slabs of charred beef tongue and double-cut galbi along with an array of banchan, bubbling stews, and sweet honey butter corn on the cob.

Korean barbecue in a lettuce leaf at San Ho Won Eric Wolfinger

Trick Dog

Clever cocktail menu themes that change every six months keep crowds coming back to Trick Dog. Owners Josh Harris and Bon Vivants Hospitality always have something up their sleeves, and are known for strange ingredients — Ritz crackers have made an appearance in drinks — but deliciousness is typically the guiding principle. During the pandemic, the theme flipped to “Quik Dog,” selling hot dogs and cocktails out to the sidewalk, which you can still order for delivery or pick-up.

Trick Dog
Trick Dog

Flour + Water

Following a months-long closure and renovation, fresh pasta destination Flour + Water returned with a sophisticated new look last year. Wrapped in warm neutral tones, the dining room now feels like the perfect setting for a special night out — one inevitably filled with a mosaic-like platter of crudo and a selection of handmade pasta, whether it be a tangle of rye pappardelle or a neatly folded ravioli stuffed with smoked duck. More than a decade in, this icon remains one of San Francisco’s most excellent Italian restaurants. 

A table of plates with crudo, pasta, and wine at Flour + Water. Krescent Carasso

Foreign Cinema

John Clark and Gayle Pirie’s landmark Mission restaurant, which is still enchanting after more than two decades, continues to delight diners with oysters, pâtés, and Madras curry sesame fried chicken while projected films light up the striking patio. Brunch is a particular favorite for dishes like Champagne omelets and house-made pop tarts.

Foreign Cinema Foreign Cinema

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buddy

A team of industry pros — Alvaro Rojas (Elda), Nicolas Torres (True Laurel), Nora Furst (Uma Casa), and Claire Sprouse (Hunky Dory in Brooklyn) — flipped the former Californios space into a buzzy but cozy and casual neighborhood bar with an exciting collection of natural wines available to enjoy on-site or to take to-go. On the small food menu look for fancy bar snacks like a fingerling potato salad and sweet Brentwood corn on the cob. The star, however, is the fried mortadella sandwich, a fat stack of meat and melted cheese. 

A table full of dishes at Buddy Albert Law

Grand Coffee

Nabeel Slimi grew up between the Bay Area and Palestine and, after the Great Recession, found a way to create a space for all of that richness, and everyone else out there with a similar complexity. The coffee is tasty, the familiar milk chocolate notes of a solid light roast anyone on Mission Street would be delighted to find.

El Gallo Giro

Saunter up to this storied truck and order yourself a plate of impossibly crispy and juicy carnitas tacos buried under a flurry of onions and cilanto. You won’t regret it. El Gallo Giro is widely respected as one of the best taco spots in the city, parked at 23rd Street and Treat Avenue, from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Monday through Friday.