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A table of pastries and coffee.
Nico Delaroque’s Maison Nico serves pâté en croûte, brioche feuilletée, and more.
Lauren Saria

16 Essential Bakeries in San Francisco

These beloved bakeries constitute San Francisco’s sweetest options for cakes, pies, cookies, and more

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Nico Delaroque’s Maison Nico serves pâté en croûte, brioche feuilletée, and more.
| Lauren Saria

San Francisco is no stranger to stellar baked goods. This city has award-winning croissants, trendsetting toast, and jiggly egg tarts thanks to an abundance of bakeries in every corner of the city. And because the bakery scene is so stellar, to keep this list fresh and evolving, a handful of spots are worth an honorable mention outside of this list. Among them are legends such as Tartine, B. Patisserie, Arizmendi, and Cinderella Bakery & Cafe — all long-running favorites worth a visit at any time of the year.

This list rounds up the sweetest options with a variety of pastry offerings, but if you’re looking for cake, pie, cookies, or the city’s famous sourdough, dig into those deeper specific lists. Of course, the East Bay has excellent bakeries, too.

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Liguria Bakery

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This old-school North Beach bakery sells one thing only: focaccia. Bring cash and get in line for bubbly, chewy focaccia topped with onions, garlic, rosemary, mushrooms, or tomatoes. Served simply on white parchment, it’s fun to walk over to Washington Square and chew contemplatively on a park bench. The line does move along, but it never hurts to pregame with a cappuccino.

Maison Nico

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Chef Nicolas Delaroque has his viennoiserie program down, with golden, flaky pastries such as cruffins and brioche feuilletee beckoning to customers. But the picture-perfect assortment of pate en croute and aspic, an intensely savory and earthy addition, are just as worthwhile. If you have time, for an additional $4 you can eat your pate at the shop and you’ll be supplied with baguette, mustard, and pickles.

Maison Nico

Holy Nata

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Follow the smell of freshly baked pasteis de nata to a tiny space down a narrow downtown side street. That’s where you’ll find new bakery Holy Nata, which specializes in one thing and one thing only: hot and fresh Portuguese egg tarts. Owners Julia Pfeiffer and José Abreu have both spent time living in Portugal and use a family recipe for their pastries, which typically sell out every day. The shop is open Tuesday through Friday and wise customers know to order ahead via text. 

A pasteis de nata. Holy Nata

Juniper

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Saint Frank is known for its coffee, but with the opening of its new bakery Juniper, the team is hoping it’ll also become known for its pastries, as well. Fine-dining pastry chef Andrea Correa of Parallel 37 consulted and set Juniper up with a choux-forward menu using the French pastry shell as a base for sweet and savory versions of the treat — think a tiramisu-inspired version, the “tiramichoux” or a Parmesan-anchovy choux. But there are non-choux reasons to visit, such as the juniper lemon escargot (the sweet pastry, not the snail) and the Cubano croissant with mojo pork, ham, and whole grain mustard.

Albert Law

jina bakes

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The bakery innovator who first put kalbijjim short rib stew inside a croissant, Jina Bakes opened an official storefront in fall 2021, making the former pop-up permanent. The French-Korean bakery expanded its menu to include a chewy injeolmi croissant topped with a rice cake and dusted in soybean powder; cream puffs filled with black sesame or hojicha cream filling; and the banoffee croissant, a croissant with bananas, toffee sauce, and whipped cream.

Jina Bakes

Jane the Bakery

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Jane, the beating heart of an ever-growing bakery empire in the Bay Area, serves all manner of breads, breakfast pastries, cakes, tarts, and more at its various locations in San Francisco and Marin. There's a full lunch menu, too, with sandwiches, salads, and grain bowls, plus a selection of gluten-free goodies. Don't skip the avocado toast.

Jane the Bakery

Arsicault Bakery

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After it was declared the "best croissant in America" by Bon Appétit, Armando Lacayo's flaky creations became subject to overwhelmingly long lines. Years later, the Inner Richmond spot is still drawing hoards for its skillfully executed kouign amann, almond croissants, morning buns, and more. And there’s a downtown location at Civic Center, too.

Arsicault Bakery

Schubert's Bakery

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Schubert’s is an institution in the Richmond, known best for its magical Swedish Princess cake, “enrobed” in pale green marzipan. Originally founded by German immigrants in 1911, the bakery now features many old-world European cakes, as well as cookies, tarts, and turnovers.

Longtime regular customer Rick David (right) enjoys a pastry and coffee with his son Nicholas at Schubert’s Bakery on Clement Street in San Francisco, Calif. on Saturday, Aug. 6, 2016 Photo By Paul Chinn/The San Francisco Chronicle via Getty Images

Breadbelly

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A trio of fine-dining chefs, coming from Atelier Crenn and Mourad, launched this popular Asian American bakery, instantly recognized by its beautiful kaya toast and tidily cut sandwiches on soft milk bread. It remains take-out only, though there’s a large (and usually crowded) parket out front. If you can snag a table, it’s a great spot to sip a black sesame cappuccino and enjoy a pan de coco or flaky scallion pancake.

Opening in the former 20th Century Cafe space, Loquat has already managed to make a name for itself on the strength of its babka. Owned by business partners Jodi Geren and Tal Mor from Four Barrel Coffee and the Mill, along with pastry chef Kristina Costa, the bakery serves delightful pastries such as Turkish coffee cream pie. Don’t skip out on the aforementioned babka, which comes in various flavors such as salted chocolate.

Mohammad Gorjestani

Wholesome Bakery

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For those with dietary restrictions, such as gluten intolerance, finding a bakery can feel impossible. Enter Wholesome Bakery on Divisadero, which crafts vegan, gluten-free, and soy-free treats. Don’t skip the cakes and pies or the Basque cheesecake, beignets, and brioche cinnamon rolls; if you’re having trouble deciding, pick up a gift box that comes with a sampling of Wholesome’s offerings.

Wholesome Bakery

Pineapple King Bakery

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This neighborhood favorite on Irving specializes in those crunchy-topped namesake buns. Customers who cannot choose between butter and custard fillings can consult the “family tree,” starting with the “grandpa and grandma” plain pineapple bun and pineapple bun with butter, and getting a little wild with the younger generations filled with matcha or salted egg. There’s also sweet Hong Kong–style milk tea, Chinese and Portuguese-style egg tarts, and pudding.

Guava butter bun at Pineapple King Pineapple King Bakery

Day Moon

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Day Moon is technically a new addition to the Sunset bakery scene, having opened a new shop this spring on Irving Street. But it’s been a staple of the Clement Street Farmer’s Market for quite a while. Expect crusty, toothsome baguettes; unique items such as rye porridge bread; and small loaves perfect for a household of one or two.

Craftsman and Wolves

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Mad scientist/baker William Werner’s masterpiece, the Rebel Within, manages to capture a soft-boiled egg within a savory, sausage-studded cake. It’s served with a tiny vial of Tabasco salt for added oomph and takes breakfast to a whole new level. Werner has since left Craftsman and Wolves, but beautiful pastries and desserts are still available at the shop, from classic croissants to an “alfajores kouign amann” with dulce de leche ganache and topped with a mini alfajores macaron.

The Rebel Within
Patricia Chang

La Mexicana Bakery

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In the heart of the Mission at 24th Street and York, this Mexican bakery is known for its rich and eggy pan dulce — shaped as seashells, turtles, alligators, and wiggling worms — as well as its Salvadoran sesame seed cake. It’s cash only, but less than 10 bucks will buy a tray of half a dozen sweet treats.

Black Jet Baking Co.

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Bernal Heights’s cute corner bakery deals in strong coffee and nostalgic treats.  Originally from Worcester, Massachusetts, hardworking baker-owner Gillian Shaw makes old-fashioned yellow and devil’s food cakes, served whole or by the slice, and in cupcake or mini-cupcake form. It’s a fully loaded case, with pecan sticky buns and sour cream coffee cake, plus egg sandwiches on bulkie rolls and even pot pie.

Liguria Bakery

This old-school North Beach bakery sells one thing only: focaccia. Bring cash and get in line for bubbly, chewy focaccia topped with onions, garlic, rosemary, mushrooms, or tomatoes. Served simply on white parchment, it’s fun to walk over to Washington Square and chew contemplatively on a park bench. The line does move along, but it never hurts to pregame with a cappuccino.

Maison Nico

Chef Nicolas Delaroque has his viennoiserie program down, with golden, flaky pastries such as cruffins and brioche feuilletee beckoning to customers. But the picture-perfect assortment of pate en croute and aspic, an intensely savory and earthy addition, are just as worthwhile. If you have time, for an additional $4 you can eat your pate at the shop and you’ll be supplied with baguette, mustard, and pickles.

Maison Nico

Holy Nata

Follow the smell of freshly baked pasteis de nata to a tiny space down a narrow downtown side street. That’s where you’ll find new bakery Holy Nata, which specializes in one thing and one thing only: hot and fresh Portuguese egg tarts. Owners Julia Pfeiffer and José Abreu have both spent time living in Portugal and use a family recipe for their pastries, which typically sell out every day. The shop is open Tuesday through Friday and wise customers know to order ahead via text. 

A pasteis de nata. Holy Nata

Juniper

Saint Frank is known for its coffee, but with the opening of its new bakery Juniper, the team is hoping it’ll also become known for its pastries, as well. Fine-dining pastry chef Andrea Correa of Parallel 37 consulted and set Juniper up with a choux-forward menu using the French pastry shell as a base for sweet and savory versions of the treat — think a tiramisu-inspired version, the “tiramichoux” or a Parmesan-anchovy choux. But there are non-choux reasons to visit, such as the juniper lemon escargot (the sweet pastry, not the snail) and the Cubano croissant with mojo pork, ham, and whole grain mustard.

Albert Law

jina bakes

The bakery innovator who first put kalbijjim short rib stew inside a croissant, Jina Bakes opened an official storefront in fall 2021, making the former pop-up permanent. The French-Korean bakery expanded its menu to include a chewy injeolmi croissant topped with a rice cake and dusted in soybean powder; cream puffs filled with black sesame or hojicha cream filling; and the banoffee croissant, a croissant with bananas, toffee sauce, and whipped cream.

Jina Bakes

Jane the Bakery

Jane, the beating heart of an ever-growing bakery empire in the Bay Area, serves all manner of breads, breakfast pastries, cakes, tarts, and more at its various locations in San Francisco and Marin. There's a full lunch menu, too, with sandwiches, salads, and grain bowls, plus a selection of gluten-free goodies. Don't skip the avocado toast.

Jane the Bakery

Arsicault Bakery

After it was declared the "best croissant in America" by Bon Appétit, Armando Lacayo's flaky creations became subject to overwhelmingly long lines. Years later, the Inner Richmond spot is still drawing hoards for its skillfully executed kouign amann, almond croissants, morning buns, and more. And there’s a downtown location at Civic Center, too.

Arsicault Bakery

Schubert's Bakery

Schubert’s is an institution in the Richmond, known best for its magical Swedish Princess cake, “enrobed” in pale green marzipan. Originally founded by German immigrants in 1911, the bakery now features many old-world European cakes, as well as cookies, tarts, and turnovers.

Longtime regular customer Rick David (right) enjoys a pastry and coffee with his son Nicholas at Schubert’s Bakery on Clement Street in San Francisco, Calif. on Saturday, Aug. 6, 2016 Photo By Paul Chinn/The San Francisco Chronicle via Getty Images

Breadbelly

A trio of fine-dining chefs, coming from Atelier Crenn and Mourad, launched this popular Asian American bakery, instantly recognized by its beautiful kaya toast and tidily cut sandwiches on soft milk bread. It remains take-out only, though there’s a large (and usually crowded) parket out front. If you can snag a table, it’s a great spot to sip a black sesame cappuccino and enjoy a pan de coco or flaky scallion pancake.

LOQUAT

Opening in the former 20th Century Cafe space, Loquat has already managed to make a name for itself on the strength of its babka. Owned by business partners Jodi Geren and Tal Mor from Four Barrel Coffee and the Mill, along with pastry chef Kristina Costa, the bakery serves delightful pastries such as Turkish coffee cream pie. Don’t skip out on the aforementioned babka, which comes in various flavors such as salted chocolate.

Mohammad Gorjestani

Wholesome Bakery

For those with dietary restrictions, such as gluten intolerance, finding a bakery can feel impossible. Enter Wholesome Bakery on Divisadero, which crafts vegan, gluten-free, and soy-free treats. Don’t skip the cakes and pies or the Basque cheesecake, beignets, and brioche cinnamon rolls; if you’re having trouble deciding, pick up a gift box that comes with a sampling of Wholesome’s offerings.

Wholesome Bakery

Pineapple King Bakery

This neighborhood favorite on Irving specializes in those crunchy-topped namesake buns. Customers who cannot choose between butter and custard fillings can consult the “family tree,” starting with the “grandpa and grandma” plain pineapple bun and pineapple bun with butter, and getting a little wild with the younger generations filled with matcha or salted egg. There’s also sweet Hong Kong–style milk tea, Chinese and Portuguese-style egg tarts, and pudding.

Guava butter bun at Pineapple King Pineapple King Bakery

Day Moon

Day Moon is technically a new addition to the Sunset bakery scene, having opened a new shop this spring on Irving Street. But it’s been a staple of the Clement Street Farmer’s Market for quite a while. Expect crusty, toothsome baguettes; unique items such as rye porridge bread; and small loaves perfect for a household of one or two.

Craftsman and Wolves

Mad scientist/baker William Werner’s masterpiece, the Rebel Within, manages to capture a soft-boiled egg within a savory, sausage-studded cake. It’s served with a tiny vial of Tabasco salt for added oomph and takes breakfast to a whole new level. Werner has since left Craftsman and Wolves, but beautiful pastries and desserts are still available at the shop, from classic croissants to an “alfajores kouign amann” with dulce de leche ganache and topped with a mini alfajores macaron.

The Rebel Within
Patricia Chang

La Mexicana Bakery

In the heart of the Mission at 24th Street and York, this Mexican bakery is known for its rich and eggy pan dulce — shaped as seashells, turtles, alligators, and wiggling worms — as well as its Salvadoran sesame seed cake. It’s cash only, but less than 10 bucks will buy a tray of half a dozen sweet treats.

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Black Jet Baking Co.

Bernal Heights’s cute corner bakery deals in strong coffee and nostalgic treats.  Originally from Worcester, Massachusetts, hardworking baker-owner Gillian Shaw makes old-fashioned yellow and devil’s food cakes, served whole or by the slice, and in cupcake or mini-cupcake form. It’s a fully loaded case, with pecan sticky buns and sour cream coffee cake, plus egg sandwiches on bulkie rolls and even pot pie.

Related Maps