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22 San Francisco Restaurants That Are Open on Monday

Believe it or not, you do have options

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Whether you’re in the industry and looking to dine out on your day off or just too exhausted with the start of the week to fathom cooking anything yourself, Monday night can occasionally require a restaurant meal. And yes, there are notoriously slim pickings.

But there are San Francisco restaurants serving excellent pasta, sushi, and tacos to kick off the week. From casual burger spots to beachy seafood shacks, these restaurants are here to answer your every Monday night craving — including the one for frilly bottomed sheng jian bao or fresh, briny oysters.

Here are 22 restaurants (and bars) open on Monday nights in San Francisco.

Health experts consider dining out to be a high-risk activity for the unvaccinated; it may pose a risk for the vaccinated, especially in areas with substantial COVID transmission.

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Note: Restaurants on this map are listed geographically.
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Somewhat hidden away inside the Kimpton Alton Hotel at Fisherman’s Wharf, Abaca breathes life into contemporary Filipino cuisine as chef Francis Ang blends his Southeast Asian roots with his California kitchen pedigree. Delicately layered plates like sisig fried rice and bay scallop pancit intertwine Northern California ingredients and Filipino classics in a dining room that’s dripping with plants and awash in sunlight

Pork steamed bun with pineapple kimchi Patricia Chang

China Live

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Georgen Chen’s massive emporium is a multi-venue complex, and the market on the ground floor serves everything from fried scallion bread and butter garlic noodles to sheng jian bao and peking duck. And while you’re there, might as well stock up on the housemade condiments.  

Wildseed

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The white-washed parklet and plant-filled dining room at this vegan Cow Hollow restaurant are always crowded, and Adriano Paganini delivers just what the neighborhood craves: a bountiful mezze featuring green falafel and smoked white bean hummus; tangles of campanelle tossed with Beyond sausage and peperonata; and cocktails spiked with lilac-hued butterfly pea tea infused gin. 

Hog Island Oyster Co.

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A trip to the Ferry Building is a treat in and of itself, but a plate of a dozen Hog Island oysters takes it over the top. Sure, the menu also offers salads, chowder, and grilled cheese but those briny bivalves are the ideal pairing for the views of the bay and bridge beyond. 

Oysters and caviar from Hog Island Hog Island Oyster Co.

Leo's Oyster Bar

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Yeah, Leo’s Oyster Bar on a Monday night would be a big vibe, but if you want to ball out in a highly designed space — the restaurant bills itself as “1950’s Beverly Hills meets Manhattan club” — to feast on oysters, crudos, caviar, lobster roll, and all other manner of fresh seafood you most certainly can.

Leo's Oyster Bar
Leo’s Oyster Bar
Patricia Chang

Tadich Grill

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We’re admittedly still scratching our heads about Tadich’s decision to dub January 6 Dave Portnoy Day, but in any case the restaurant is still a San Francisco landmark and a destination for classic seafood. It’s the perfect kind of place to take out-of-towners on a Monday night; they can soak up a piece of San Francisco history and gawk at the train-car-like booths and other flourishes in the wooden bar.

Peacekeeper

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Peacekeeper brings the outdoors in with its expansive sky lights and abundance of houseplants trailing down the back bar. There’s no food save for chips and salsa, but you’d be hard pressed to find a better cocktail option in the Lower Nob Hill neighborhood on a Monday night. 

The sunny interior of Peacekeeper with tall ceilings and large skylights. Patricia Chang

You can cozy up to the front fireplace and order one of Spruce’s famous burgers even on a chill Monday night. Or go all in on the menu of New Californian classics at this Michelin-starred San Francisco mainstay.

The Spruce burger Spruce

Pakwan Restaurant - Tenderloin

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You’ve got options when it comes to tracking down Pakwan’s affordable Indo-Pakistani eats. There are outposts serving long menus of biryani and fragrant curries from the Tenderloin to Ingleside. 

Marufuku Ramen

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This Hakata-style ramen-ya has been drawing long lines since it opened in 2017 but only because the bowls of rich, creamy tonkotsu broth and thin noodles are some of the best in the city. At least you can wander the Japantown shops while you wait. 

Mandalay Restaurant

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There’s no shortage of Burmese restaurant options in SF, but if you’re going to do it, may as well hit Mandalay, one of the city’s oldest and best. The menu is packed with flavor from the samusa soup to the iconic tea leaf salad. 

Lahpet thoke at Mandalay Omar Mamoon

Fiorella Clement

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There’s still plenty of pillowy pizza and fresh pasta to be had at this, the original location of Fiorella. But now you can find its signature toile wallpaper featuring SF celebs and herbed chicken wings in both Russian Hill and the Inner Sunset.

Chao Pescao

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Rene Denis flipped the former Soluma space into the unabashedly bright Chao Pescao, bringing with it a menu of fish, arepas, and housemade ice cream to Civic Center. Denis is a longtime San Francisco restaurant owner and his Cuban and Colombian comforts continue to please.

Exterior of Chao Pescao Chao Pescao

If your Monday calls for a healthy dose of carbs, look no further than Hayes Valley’s a Mano, where an ever-changing list of pastas can be accompanied with small plates like marinated olives and fontina arancini. As you would expect from an Adriano Paganini restaurant, it’s a stylish space with bright splashes of red, green, and white (representing the colors of the Italian flag) throughout. 

Horsefeather

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This top-notch cocktail bar woos with a whiskey- and gin-soaked list that’s just the right balance of creative and approachable. And be warned: if you take on the Daywalker — a formidable combo of tequila, mango, and tepache foam — then you may crave something to eat. The katsu sandwich and cheeseburger are excellent options. 

Step inside the narrow dining room at this Lower Haight haven for modern Mexican food and you’ll be greeted with fluttering turquoise papel picado and vegetable-centric plates like roasted carrot tostada and stunning charred cabbage. Drinks range from smoky to sweet, but avoid being overly fussy.  

The interior of Otra with blue papel picado hanging over a long dining room with concrete floors. Lauren Saria/Eater SF

Hook Fish Co

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Soak up the laidback surfer vibes at this Outer Sunset seafood shack, where the dedication to transparency in sourcing means you’ll know the port, vessel, and method that brought that tuna poke to your plate. It’s casual fare — think fish tacos, burritos, and ceviche — that can be enjoyed on the wooden parklet adorned with native plants. 

WesBurger n' More

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Whether you love a beefy burger or only crave them occasionally, WesBurger N’ More, with its prime location on 18th and Mission, is here to satisfy. The patty is thin and juicy with crispy edges and the potato buns offer just the correct amount of squish. Plus it’s mustard, pickle, ketchup, onion, and American cheese all the way baby. 

A Wesburger with melted American cheese and a potato bun. Wes Rowe

Mama Ji's

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No frills Chinese cuisine is the name of the game at this Castro restaurant. There’s dim sum on the weekends but the weekday dinner menu has juicy Shanghai dumplings plus dry-fried green beans, kung pao shrimp, and Beijing-style chicken with eggplant — all imbued with the delicate essence of wok hei. 

Fried onion cakes Mama Ji’s/Facebook

Marlena Restaurant

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This husband-and-wife run restaurant is one of the Bay Area’s biggest breakout hits of 2021, opening mid-pandemic and earning a Michelin star just one year later. Chef David Fisher and pastry chef Serena Chow Fisher serve elegant and artful four-course tasting menus for $65 per person, kicking off dinner with cured hiramasa and wrapping things up with black sesame sponge cake and candied kumquat.

Cellarmaker House of Pizza

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For Detroit-style square pizza with a good ratio of crust to toppings and those perfect lacy edges, as well as strong IPA, Cellarmaker delivers. The Mission pizzeria currently offers takeout and outdoor dining only, and you can place your order online if you please.

The classic pepperoni pizza at Cellarmaker

Chīsai Sushi Club

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Since August 2021, former Ichi Sushi chef Erik Aplin has been bringing affordable omakase to the Bernal Heights neighborhood at the intimate Chisai Sushi Club. The 13-course tasting menu costs $80 — not unreasonable in a city with many excellent and more expensive sushi options — and there’s even a vegetarian option for $65. Just be warned: the menu breaks from tradition with dishes like uni carbonara and BLTA hand roll.

Uni carbonara made with udon noodles, bacon, uni cream sauce, and a layer of raw uni. Darren Samuelson/Chisai Sushi Club

Abacá

Pork steamed bun with pineapple kimchi Patricia Chang

Somewhat hidden away inside the Kimpton Alton Hotel at Fisherman’s Wharf, Abaca breathes life into contemporary Filipino cuisine as chef Francis Ang blends his Southeast Asian roots with his California kitchen pedigree. Delicately layered plates like sisig fried rice and bay scallop pancit intertwine Northern California ingredients and Filipino classics in a dining room that’s dripping with plants and awash in sunlight

Pork steamed bun with pineapple kimchi Patricia Chang

China Live

Georgen Chen’s massive emporium is a multi-venue complex, and the market on the ground floor serves everything from fried scallion bread and butter garlic noodles to sheng jian bao and peking duck. And while you’re there, might as well stock up on the housemade condiments.  

Wildseed

The white-washed parklet and plant-filled dining room at this vegan Cow Hollow restaurant are always crowded, and Adriano Paganini delivers just what the neighborhood craves: a bountiful mezze featuring green falafel and smoked white bean hummus; tangles of campanelle tossed with Beyond sausage and peperonata; and cocktails spiked with lilac-hued butterfly pea tea infused gin. 

Hog Island Oyster Co.

Oysters and caviar from Hog Island Hog Island Oyster Co.

A trip to the Ferry Building is a treat in and of itself, but a plate of a dozen Hog Island oysters takes it over the top. Sure, the menu also offers salads, chowder, and grilled cheese but those briny bivalves are the ideal pairing for the views of the bay and bridge beyond. 

Oysters and caviar from Hog Island Hog Island Oyster Co.

Leo's Oyster Bar

Leo's Oyster Bar
Leo’s Oyster Bar
Patricia Chang

Yeah, Leo’s Oyster Bar on a Monday night would be a big vibe, but if you want to ball out in a highly designed space — the restaurant bills itself as “1950’s Beverly Hills meets Manhattan club” — to feast on oysters, crudos, caviar, lobster roll, and all other manner of fresh seafood you most certainly can.

Leo's Oyster Bar
Leo’s Oyster Bar
Patricia Chang

Tadich Grill

We’re admittedly still scratching our heads about Tadich’s decision to dub January 6 Dave Portnoy Day, but in any case the restaurant is still a San Francisco landmark and a destination for classic seafood. It’s the perfect kind of place to take out-of-towners on a Monday night; they can soak up a piece of San Francisco history and gawk at the train-car-like booths and other flourishes in the wooden bar.

Peacekeeper

The sunny interior of Peacekeeper with tall ceilings and large skylights. Patricia Chang

Peacekeeper brings the outdoors in with its expansive sky lights and abundance of houseplants trailing down the back bar. There’s no food save for chips and salsa, but you’d be hard pressed to find a better cocktail option in the Lower Nob Hill neighborhood on a Monday night. 

The sunny interior of Peacekeeper with tall ceilings and large skylights. Patricia Chang

Spruce